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Recent buys

About Nothing over 6 bucks each!

Previous Entry Recent buys Nov. 29th, 2007 @ 03:54 pm Next Entry
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From:atomicmmonster
Date:November 30th, 2007 12:34 am (UTC)
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This set offers some of the best transfers I've ever seen on budget DVDs of public domain fare. The Dick Tracy and Sherlock Holmes movies, save for the last one in the set (Can't currently remember the title.) are all near the quality of an official studio-released DVD.

I can practically guarantee you that this means they stole transfers from a laserdisc or DVD (either from an official release or from a Roan Group restoration).
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From:joeytheteapot
Date:November 30th, 2007 08:51 am (UTC)
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So they DO steal transfers from other people. Is that even legal? Or do the people they're stealing from just not give a rat's ass?
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From:prosfilaes
Date:November 30th, 2007 03:28 pm (UTC)
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Legally, under US law, a new copyright requires creative acts. Mere copying does not get a new copyright; the establishing case had to do with high-quality photographs of paintings, which are hard to get access to and complex to copy well, like movies. That is, I'd say it's well-established that a simple transfer gets no copyright. No matter how much work you put into making a better copy, as long as it's simply a better copy of the original, there shouldn't get a new copyright. A court suit might get somewhere, but the precedent is against them.
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From:atomicmmonster
Date:December 2nd, 2007 02:51 am (UTC)
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Although the company that made the restored version could sue'em over the breaking of the copy-protection on their DVD...
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